Canada

Canada

Unfair comparison of cold weather

Correcting two points in Windpower Monthly's Arctic Survival, June 1996 article: 1) neither the Tacke turbine near Kincardine, Ontario, nor the Cowley Ridge wind farms are anywhere near the Arctic; and 2) the Yukon Energy Corporation's turbine does not operate in typical Canadian conditions. Research focussing on severe rime icing has been done in Finland but nowhere in North American other than in Whitehorse, Yukon.

We greatly appreciate the recognition the Canadian Wind Industry is receiving in your publication. We too often tend to soldier on quietly without blowing our own horn. Yukon Energy would, however, like to correct two erroneous impressions that your readers may draw from your article on wind development in our region (Designing for Arctic Survival, Windpower Monthly, June 1996).

Neither the Tacke 600 kW wind turbine near Kincardine, Ontario, nor the Cowley Ridge wind farms are anywhere near the Arctic. These are located in southern Canada at a latitude south of much of Europe. They are exposed to somewhat colder weather than many parts of Europe, however.

To imply the Yukon Energy Corporation's Bonus 150 kW turbine is operating in typical Canadian conditions and not doing so well is not correct. YEC's Bonus would have no trouble operating any of the other sites described with equal or greater efficiency. Any of the other projects described would perform worse than the Bonus 150 machine in its location because none have to cope with, nor are they designed to cope with, severe rime icing. This very challenging problem has been the focus of research in Finland, more recently with the involvement of Scandinavian countries and the European Union, but nowhere in North American other than in Whitehorse, Yukon, is this challenge being addressed. This project cannot be compared directly with the others. The 80 kW Lagerwey machine is the only one operating in the Arctic and is to be commended for its achievements in cold climate operations. Whitehorse, while north of 60ยก latitude, can best be described as sub-Arctic, but at higher elevations where the higher wind regimes are found, there is severe rime icing, particularly in the first three months of winter.

These differences between the projects could have been made more clear.

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