Denmark

Denmark

Ørsted builds team for North Sea energy island bid

Danish developer enlists help of contractors behind artificial islands in Monaco and Dubai for energy island tender

Van Oord has previously constructed the Palm Jumeirah archipelago in Dubai and other artificial islands
Van Oord has previously constructed the Palm Jumeirah archipelago in Dubai and other artificial islands

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Ørsted and institutional investor ATP have recruited three specialist construction firms to aid their bid to build and operate Denmark’s planned North Sea energy island.

They have enlisted the help of Van Oord, Bouygues and Aarsleff for their planned bid. The new partners have individually helped with land reclamation projects – creating new land from the sea – off Monaco and Dubai, as well as offshore wind farms.

The Danish government is due to tender the North Sea energy island – an artificially constructed island serving as a hub to connect offshore wind farms in the North Sea and distribute the power generated by the projects – in 2023.

Renewable energy developer Ørsted and Danish investor ATP plan to enter the upcoming tender round.

They explained that they have sought help from the three construction companies due to their design and engineering competences, experience in complex offshore construction projects around the globe.

Danish contractor Aarsleff has helped construction of the Oresund Link railway and motorway bridge connecting Denmark and Sweden, led several harbour expansion projects in the Nordics and has installed foundations at offshore wind farms including 209MW Horns Rev 2 Horns Rev 2 (209MW) Offshoreoff Blåvandshuk, Denmark, Europe Click to see full details and 630MW London Array London Array (630MW) Offshoreoff Kent, England, UK, Europe Click to see full details.

French firm Bouygues Travaux Publics designs, builds and operates large-scale offshore construction projects including bridges, tunnels and land reclamations. It also helped expand the city of Monaco into the sea.

And Dutch marine contractor Van Oord focuses on dredging, land reclamation and offshore wind. It has also constructed the Palm Jumeirah archipelago in Dubai and other artificial islands.

Ørsted and ATP plan to also examine how best to integrate power-to-x technology — to use excess electricity to produce chemical products, such as green hydrogen — within the energy island and future energy infrastructure in the North Sea.

Green hydrogen or ammonia could be used to decarbonise sectors such as aviation and heavy transport, the Danish government had suggested.

The Danish state would maintain a majority stake in the project.

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