South Korea

South Korea

Samsung receives DNV nod for large offshore wind floater

Samsung Heavy Industries developed Tri-Star Float for its home market, as South Korea pushes large-scale offshore wind development

Samsung Heavy Industries previously developed a 7MW offshore turbine and installed a prototype installed at Levenmouth in Scotland, now owned by ORE Catapult
Samsung Heavy Industries previously developed a 7MW offshore turbine and installed a prototype installed at Levenmouth in Scotland, now owned by ORE Catapult

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Samsung Heavy Industries (SHI) has received approval in principle from classification body DNV for a 9.5MW offshore wind floating platform designed for the South Korean offshore wind market, the company announced on 19 July.

The Tri-Star Float technology is based on a steel-frame compact design which SHI claims will help “dramatically shorten the construction period from design and transportation to installation”.

The design is said to have been optimised for safety in extreme marine environments, based on 40-year research on wind speeds, tides and water depth in the East Sea, also known as the Sea of Japan.

The company began developing the floater model in October 2020 and completed water tank tests at the Korea Research Institute of Ships & Ocean Engineering (Kriso) in March 2021. 

“The offshore floater will enable us to make forays into the renewable energy sector using our capacity to build large-scale offshore plants,” said Wang Lee, vice president of offshore business at SHI. 

“We hope our development is aligned with the government’s green new deal policy,” he added.

SHI has said it plans to target the government-led 200MW Donghae 1 Donghae 1 (200MW) Offshoreoff Ulsan, South Korea, Asia-Pacific Click to see full details project.

The company developed a 7MW wind turbine prototype for the ORE Catapult site in 2013, but later withdrew from the European offshore wind market and downsized its global activities in the sector.

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