Germany

Germany

RWE to test offshore wind 'collared' foundation

RWE believes its ‘collared monopile’ will increase the foundations' load-bearing capacity and increase structural stability

The collars will be installed at seabed level, with grout filling the gap between it and the monopile
The collars will be installed at seabed level, with grout filling the gap between it and the monopile

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RWE will use new ‘collared monopiles’ at its 342MW Kaskasi Kaskasi (342MW) Offshoreoff Heligoland, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, Europe Click to see full details offshore wind farm to improve the foundations’ structural integrity.

It believes the 'collars' should increase the foundations load-bearing capacity and prove especially effective in “difficult ground”.

Using a new noise-reducing installation technique, offshore contractor Deme Group will install the ‘collars’ on three of the German North Sea project’s foundations next year.

They will be installed at seabed level, with the space between the collar and the foundation being filled with grout, creating a stable connection.

While monopiles are usually hammered into the seabed, Deme will use a vibro pile-driving technique.

Offshore construction works are due to start in the third quarter of 2021 ahead of commercial operations in summer 2022.

Deme will be the first offshore contractor to use vibro pile-driving, although others have deployed alternative noise-reduction methods.

Van Oord, for example, has used acoustic resonators and a big bubble curtain to reduce disturbance for marine mammals.

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