Germany

Germany

Vattenfall targets German onshore wind in new partnership

The Swedish energy firm will jointly develop onshore wind farms in eastern and southern Germany with Primus Energie

Vattenfall has developed 74.4MW of operational onshore wind capacity in Germany, according to Windpower Intelligence
Vattenfall has developed 74.4MW of operational onshore wind capacity in Germany, according to Windpower Intelligence

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Vattenfall has formed a long-term strategic partnership with German renewable energy company Primus Energie to plan and jointly develop onshore wind farms in eastern and southern Germany.

The Swedish energy firm will act as lead investor for the two companies’ portfolio and market its electricity, while Primus will focus on project development.

It added that it aims to “minimise the electricity production costs through innovative technologies and the use of economies of scale in the portfolio”, but has not confirmed what these technologies will be.

Vattenfall added that it aims to use larger, more powerful turbines, and possibly hybrid projects paired with a storage component.

The partners have also not confirmed how much capacity they intend to build.

The two companies said they believe Germany must expand onshore wind if it is to meet its target of cutting emissions by at least 55% by 2030 compared to 1990 levels.

However, they both acknowledged there will be challenges in doing so.

Vattenfall stated that “compared to other countries, Germany does not currently offer an easy market environment for expanding onshore wind energy”.

“The challenges for the development of wind power projects on land have grown steadily, even though it is the cheapest and most efficient regenerative energy production,” Jürgen Meyer-Menz, managing director of Primus Energie, admitted.

However, both Meyer-Menz and Vattenfall added that challenges – such as lengthy permitting procedures – can be overcome by partnerships. Vattenfall has previously partnered with other renewable energy developers in Germany, including Gaia, with which it is targeting onshore wind farms in northern Hesse and parts of Rhineland-Palatinate.

Germany’s federal cabinet last month approved a draft law to accelerate lawsuits against already-permitted infrastructure projects, including onshore wind farms.

And last year economic affairs and energy minister Peter Altmaier unveiled an 18-point action plan to increase public acceptance of wind farms and legal certainty for developers – but is yet to implement it.

Primus Energie has helped develop 82 onshore wind farms in Germany, according to its website, but the combined capacity of these projects is unclear.

Meanwhile, Vattenfall has developed 74.4MW of operational onshore wind capacity in Germany, according to Windpower Intelligence, the research and data division of Windpower Monthly.

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