Spain

Spain

Namibian wind farm to use 'self-erecting' tower developer

Nabrawind will supply four of wind towers to a Namibian wind farm being built by Franco-Namibian developer Innovent.

Nabrawind's design uses hydraulic jacks on the ground to elevate the tower sections and introduce new frame modules at ground level
Nabrawind's design uses hydraulic jacks on the ground to elevate the tower sections and introduce new frame modules at ground level

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The 8MW Queen Elizabeth Queen Elizabeth (8MW) OnshoreKaras Region, Namibia, Middle East & Africa Click to see full details project in Karas, south-west Namibia will use Nabrawind’s tubular towers and transition piece to directly anchor the fourt 80m turbines to the ground.

Construction work will start in the second half of this year ahead of planned commissioning for 2021.

The Spanish manufacturer has previously installed a prototype of its self-erecting tower design in northern Spain, and has also received orders from Innovent for a wind farm in Morocco. The novel “Nabralift” design uses hydraulic jacks on the ground to elevate the tower sections and introduce new frame modules at ground level. Nabrawind claims that its self-erecting design reduces the need for concrete foundations by 95%, saving around 1,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions compared with other turbine towers, and is more cost effective.

However, due to the prohibitive transport and manufacturing costs for the project, Nabrawind will be supplying tubular towers that are forced to use gravitational foundations.

Nabrawind’s general manager Eneko Sanz said the company aims to target larger projects in 2021.

Namibia has just 5.22MW of operational wind power capacity, with a further 184MW in various stages of development, according to Windpower Intelligence, the research and data division of Windpower Monthly.

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