Ørsted and Equinor head up new offshore action group

Ørsted and Equinor will lead a new group aiming to represent the opportunities offered by offshore wind and other ocean-based renewable energy sources in climate change discussions.

The group aims to highlight what industry, financiers and governments can do to sustainably scale-up offshore wind (pic: Ørsted)
The group aims to highlight what industry, financiers and governments can do to sustainably scale-up offshore wind (pic: Ørsted)

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Through the newly created Ocean Renewable Energy Action Coalition they hope to bring together civil society, intergovernmental institutions and industry, the offshore wind developers stated.

The group, which also includes turbine manufacturers Siemens Gamesa and MHI Vestas, intends to prepare a "vision for 2050", highlighting what industry, financiers and governments can do to sustainably scale-up offshore wind.

It plans to make an initial statement at the UN Ocean Conference in Lisbon, Portugal in June.

The group is completed by offshore service providers CWind and Global Marine Group, Japanese energy group JERA, developer Mainstream Renewable Power, oil and gas giant Shell, Dutch transmission system operator Tennet and UK seabed landlord the Crown Estate.

“If we’re serious about fighting the climate crisis, it’s vital we decarbonise the world’s energy use as quickly as possible through technologies like offshore wind," Ørsted’s vice president Benj Sykes explained.

The coalition’s members highlighted a September 2019 report, which found ocean-based renewable energy — such as offshore wind, floating solar, tidal and wave power — could provide nearly 10% of the annual greenhouse gas emissions reductions needed by 2050 to limit global warming to 1.5C above pre-industrial levels. 

Offshore wind would account for the most reduction, according to the report produced for the High-Level Panel for a Sustainable Ocean Economy, a panel of 14 serving heads of government.

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