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UK onshore future in doubt following Conservative win

UK: The UK's wind sector could be thrown into disarray as the Conservative Party looks set to form a majority in the House of Commons.

Many thought the election would result in a hung parliament and a coalition headed by Labour and the Scottish National Party. However, both Labour and the Conservatives' former coalition partners, the Liberal Democrats, lost seats in key areas. 

One of the senior Lib Dem MPs to go was energy secretary Ed Davey who has supported wind power and renewables against elements of the Conservative Party. 

The Conservative win is unlikely to affect offshore wind. However, a commitment to stem the growth of the onshore wind power was a key focus in the party's manifesto. 

One of prime minister David Cameron's next tasks will be to select a cabinet, including a new energy minister. Currently, Matthew Hancock handles the junior energy minister role. 

The party's manifesto promises to end public subsidies for new projects and to change the law to give local authorities rather than central government the final say on wind farm applications.

It was one of the very few specific references to wind power in the manifestos of all the major political parties contesting this election. 

Energy policy, except where it concerns consumer prices, was not high on their lists for issues that might galvanise an electorate showing little enthusiasm for the options available.

UK: The UK's wind sector could be thrown into disarray as the Conservative Party looks set to form a majority in the House of Commons. 
Many thought the election would result in a hung parliament and a coalition headed by Labour and the Scottish National Party. However, both Labour and the Conservatives former coalition partners the Liberal Democrats, lost seats in key areas. 
One of the senior Lib Dem MPs to go was energy minister Ed Davey who has supported wind power and renewables against elements of the Conservative Party. 
The Conservative win is unlikely to affect offshore wind. However, a commitment to stem the growth of the onshore wind power was a key focus in the party's manifesto. 
One of prime minister David Cameron's next tasks will be to select a cabinet, including a new energy minister. Currently Michael Fallon handled the junior energy minister role.
The party's manifesto promises to end public subsidies for new projects and to change the law to give local authorities rather than central government the final say on wind farm applications.
It was one of the very few specific references to wind power in the manifestos of all the major political parties contesting this election. 
Energy policy, except where it concerns consumer prices, was not high on their lists for issues that might galvanise an electorate showing little enthusiasm for the options available.

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