Visit windpowermonthlyevents.com for the latest on our upcoming conferences and webcasts

Germany

Germany

ONE THOUSAND MEGAWATT, ANOTHER BENCHMARK

By end 1995 wind power capacity in Germany reached 1129.6 MW according to wind institute, DEWI. In 1995, 498.3 MW was installed, made up of 1062 machines. The total number of turbines on the grid was 3647. DEWI's Knud Rehfeldt expects the market to slow considerably, though. Among wind turbine manufacturers, Enercon continues to lead the field, followed by Tacke, Micon and Vestas. The story is illustrated by a table of market share among manufacturers and a table of the geographical spread of wind plant.

By the end of 1995 installed wind power capacity in Germany reached 1129.6 MW according to a preliminary report from wind institute, DEWI. In 1995, 498.3 MW was installed, made up of 1062 machines, bringing the total number of wind turbines on the German grid to 3647. The average size of machine installed in 1995 was 469 kW compared with 370.6 kW in the previous year.

Over the last six years, the rate of growth in wind power capacity has steadily increased, but this could change in 1996. DEWI's Knud Rehfeldt expects the market to slow down considerably. "The number of megawatt installed will continue to grow but no longer exponentially," he comments.

Among wind turbine manufacturers, German Enercon continues to lead the field with nearly 30% of the turbines installed in 1995 coming out of its gates. Following at a distance are German Tacke and Danish companies Micon and Vestas. Another bunching of manufacturers follows with AN Maschinenbau, makers of Bonus turbines, Nordtank, Wind World, GET, Wistra and Hanseatische and Südwind.

The two coastal Länder continue to bear the brunt of development, although inland North Rhine Westfalia is receiving its fair share of turbines, with 65 MW added last year. The east German inland Länder of Brandenburg and Saxony are also pursuing wind energy with great enthusiasm and are close to matching the efforts of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern which benefits from the good winds along its long Baltic Sea coastline.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles
and free email bulletins.

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Windpower Monthly Events

Latest Jobs