Visit windpowermonthlyevents.com for the latest on our upcoming conferences and webcasts

Australia

Australia

Women power the green electron way

Many observers are surprised that Australia's national Green Power program launched by the Sustainable Energy Development Authority has got as far as it has in just one year. The presence of so many utility executives at the presentation of the program in Sydney on May 14 was perhaps proof enough of the greening of the country's power industry.

It was a potent image. Two executive women, the Sustainable Energy Development Authority's Cathy Zoi and the Australian Consumer Association's Mara Bun, told a roomful of men in black how they should go about promoting green power. The suits, they said, must offer customers green electrons generated from solar, wind, biomass and run-of-river hydro sources. What's more, the two women assured, the suits will learn to like it.

The presence of so many utility executives at the presentation of Australia's national Green Power program by Zoi and Bun in Sydney on May 14 was perhaps proof enough of the greening of the power industry. Unlike their customers, the utilities have no real choice. The Australian electricity industry has, with few exceptions, been dragged, cajoled, and pushed into offering consumers a green choice. Many observers are surprised that the green power program launched by the Sustainable Energy Development Authority (SEDA) (Windpower Monthly, May 1997) has got as far as it has in just one year. "It's just fantastic," says Zoi, admitting she never expected the rest of the industry to grab and run with the green power product. Zoi says Australia is decidedly out in front of most other countries in the marketing of green electrons.

The country's Green Power program will allow 75% of the population -- some 13 million Australians -- to buy some or all of their electricity from renewable sources through premium based schemes such as energyAustralia's Pure Energy program in New South Wales (NSW). Customers who buy all of the electricity under the program are charged an extra A$0.038/kWh.

Although the initial pilot program in NSW did not attract the 25,000 customers Zoi expected, some 17,000 households are buying green power through eight electricity retailers. In addition, some 800 commercial customers have signed up. Zoi says this new market has pushed $43 million of new investments into renewable energy projects.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles
and free email bulletins.

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Windpower Monthly Events

Latest Jobs