Visit windpowermonthlyevents.com for the latest on our upcoming conferences and webcasts

United States

United States

No endangered species identified

Species identified in the bat kill incident in eastern US appear to be limited to the Vespertilionidae family and include red bats, eastern pipistrelles, little brown bats and northern long-eared bats. These are not endangered species. This story accompanies main article "Alarming evidence of bat kills in eastern US."

Species of bat so far identified in the bird kills incident at the Mountaineer Wind Farm in West Virginia (main story) appear to be limited to the Vespertilionidae family and include red bats, eastern pipistrelles, little brown bats, hoary bats and northern long-eared bats. These are not endangered species. Studies of bat kills at the three turbine Buffalo Mountain facility in Tennessee, overseen by Chuck Nicholson of the Tennessee Valley Authority, show that about two-thirds of the dead animals have been red bats. Other species involved are the hoary bat, the eastern pipistrelle, big brown bat and the silver-haired bat, he says. "Most of the mortality is occurring during late summer and fall. It's probably by bats dispersing or migrating through the area," adds Nicholson. A bat biologist at the University of Tennessee, Maarten Vonhof, says that recently a lot of eastern pipistrelles have been found at kill sites. "Nobody knows why," says Vonhof.

Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles
and free email bulletins.

Sign up now
Already registered?
Sign in

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Windpower Monthly Events

Latest Jobs